Do Mormons believe in the Second Coming?

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June 17, 2014

Someone asked us: Yes or No answer please. Do Mormons believe in the second coming of Christ?

Answer: Yes.

See also:
The Second Coming of Jesus Christ
Do Mormons Believe in the Rapture?
It’s Not on my Calendar

Jesus Christ returns in glory surrounded by angels

Jesus Christ returns in glory

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Question Box: I’m Angry with God

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October 20, 2013

Question: “I’m angry with God.  I’ve always been a good person, helped others, compassionate, loving and caring. I’ve endured much pain in my life and heartache.  I’ve reached a point in my life where I’m asking when will all of the turmoil and loss stop??  I’ve truly had enough.  I’m beaten down and broken.  I’m tired of always being the “Do Gooder”  When is God going to lighten the load?  Help with my burdens or please just give me a break!  I truly can’t continue on like this.”

Not knowing the specific circumstances of your current slump I can only give a general overview of the goodness of God and possible suggestions on how to find peace in your situation.   After reading your plea and thinking about it during church, we sang the song , “How Gentle God’s Command” (pg 125 in the LDS hymn book), please allow me to quote the first and third verses of the song:  “How gentle God’s commands! How kind his precepts are! Come cast your burden on the Lord and trust his constant care…..Why should this anxious load Press down your weary mind?  Haste to your Heavenly Father’s throne and sweet refreshment find”

In the Old Testament Job was put through some testing when God gave permission to Satan to test Job’s resolve.  After losing his fortune, his family, and his health, he was further plagued by his supposed friends who came over to question him about what he had done wrong to warrant such trials.  After about 40 chapters of arguing, with his friends and even his wife urging him to “curse God and die”, the Lord himself interjects into the dialogue with what some might regard as a rather terse explanation.  In Job 40:7-8 “Gird up thy loins now like a man: I will demand of thee and declare thou unto me”  “Wilt thou disannul my judgment? Wilt thou condemn me, that thou mayest be righteous?  He then goes on to explain how we mortals can’t understand the majesty and design of God.

It seems to me that the path to greater peace in your life might be in turning MORE to God and trusting deeper in Him, rather than in being mad at him for the trials that are surrounding you.  A suggestion is to go to the Lord in prayer and thank him for your trials.  This might take a bit of a change in your thinking but from personal experience when I have tried this I have been given insight into what the bigger plan might be.  His inspiration has also helped me recognize the source of the problem and given me insight as to how to deal with it.  It also calms my troubled heart and allows me to caste my burdens on the Lord-and continue on with the job of doing good and helping others.

Keep up the good fight but rather than cursing God, hasten to his throne and be blest by his eternal goodness.

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Question Box: Organ Donation

by
July 11, 2013

Q: Do Mormons believe in organ donation?

A: We certainly do.  We wrote some posts about organ donation and cremation a couple of years ago. Check them out.

Cremation I

Cremation II

Organ Donation

 

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Can I Marry a Mormon?

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June 5, 2013

Q. Hello, my name is Becky and I’ve become infatuated with a Mormon boy. He’s 22, and I’m 18. I am not Mormon, but have seriously been thinking about becoming Mormon. Not only because of him, but because I feel it would be good for me. My mother on the other hand, thinks I’m being stupid and does not support me in any way. I believe it’s my choice, and I would like to marry him. If I don’t become Mormon, I shall be Christian. Can Mormons marry Christians? Would it be bad if they aren’t sealed?

Hi Becky! It sounds like you have at least two questions here:

1) Can I/Should I be a Mormon?

2) What would a mixed-religious marriage commitment be like if I remained a non-Mormon Christian?

Young love

To the first question, a hearty YES!

Of course, if you embark on such a momentous decision you should do it for the right reasons, and having a crush on a guy, while thrilling, just won’t have the kind of lasting draw to keep you in communion with Christ in the restored church. Talk to your local missionaries and they will help you understand and obtain the deeper motivations that will bring you everlasting life and joy. Introduce them to your mother, too. They can help alleviate her fears.

And my answer to the second question is: CAUTION!

Mixed-faith marriages are tough on any family. They are stressful, and only get more stressful as the hormones wear off. Mormons are particularly hard-hit because marriage itself is a sacred ordinance and covenant with God that must be entered into by both husband and wife. Is it bad not to be sealed? Well, it’s not “going-to-hell” bad, but it’s settling for less. Less than what Our Father has prepared us to become.

I’ve written back to another person about this topic before. Please read it next. It’s called, “I’m in Love with a Mormon, What Now?

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Question Box: What is the nature of God and the Trinity?

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April 14, 2013

the first vision

Q: What is the nature of God and the Trinity?

We believe that the Trinity (or Godhead, as we more commonly refer to them) is composed of three separate and distinct perfect Beings—God, the Father; his Son, Jesus Christ; and the Holy Ghost (Acts 7:55-56; Article of Faith 1).  We believe our Heavenly Father, and Jesus Christ have a body that is made of flesh and bones just like ours (D&C 130:22); however, they have bodies and are no longer subject to death, sickness, or pain.  The Holy Ghost does not have a body of flesh and bones, rather he has a spirit body (D&C 130:22), but he looks like a normal person (1 Nephi 11:11).  All three are perfect and can be spoken of as God collectively and separate gods individually.  Their entire focus is to help each of us return to the Father, and become like Him (Moses 1:39).

 

Our Heavenly Father is the father of the spirits of all those who have, or ever will be born into this world (Abraham 3:22-23, Moses 6:51).  He is Jesus Christ’s literal father.  He oversaw and directed the creation of the world upon which we now live (Moses 1:32).  To him, we pray and He answers our prayers in his own time and in his own way.  He loves us and has provided a plan whereby, we, his spirit children, can come to earth, receive a body, experience adversity, and have the opportunity to return to Him (Abraham 3:23-27).  He knew beforehand that we would make mistakes.  These mistakes would make us imperfect and as he is perfect, we could not return to live with him again.  So, he provided a way that our mistakes could be erased.   To accomplish this he provided his son, Jesus Christ, to set right, everything that would prevent us from being perfect, our sins included (Moses 6:53-62).

 Christus

Jesus Christ, is the literal Son of God and his mother was mortal (Luke 1:28-38, Alma 7:10).  As such, Christ, was enabled to experience mortality as we do.  He suffered sickness, pain, hunger, and temptation.  Nevertheless, he lived a perfect life.  This allowed him to suffer and ultimately die for our imperfections (Alma 7:11-13).  In this way, he has the ability to set us at one with the Father again and allow us to return to live with the Father.  As a free gift, through his atonement and subsequent resurrection, he provides every person born into this world a resurrected and perfect body.  But, to return to the Father’s presence, Christ requires us to believe that He can in fact save us, repent of our sins, be baptized in his prescribed way, be given the gift of the Holy Ghost, and then endure in faith until the end of our mortal lives.  If we do this with his constant help, we will be granted a place in the Father’s kingdom (3 Nephi 27:14-22).

 

To help us find Jesus Christ, accept his teachings, and then continue in his prescribed way, God provided the Holy Ghost. The Holy Ghost is the third member of the Godhead.  He has many functions, but he helps God’s children to return to Him by helping them find Jesus Christ, teaching them truth line upon line if they desire to learn more, and ultimately purifying and refining them in their journey of being a disciple of Jesus Christ (1 Nephi 10:17-19).

 

I am grateful for these immortal perfect beings.  I know that I am the Father’s son and that he has provided a way for me to become like Him through his Son and that the Holy Ghost will help me in this endeavor.

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